Bats

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Bat in a tree

Bat Information

If you’re being kept awake all night by bats flying around in your chimney or attic, then it’s time to call Trutech! We can help you return to your pest-free day-to-day life with effective bat control and bat removal services. Once the bats have been removed from your property, one of our animal control technicians can perform a detailed inspection to determine the point of entry for the bats. Once they have determined where the bats are entering, our licensed technicians can recommend a way to keep bats from entering back into your house or garage.

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What does a bat look like?

Instead of arms, bats have wings that stretch from their hands to their bodies. They also have thumbs used for climbing, fighting, and grasping food. Bats do not use their eyes to locate meals, and instead rely on echolocation to see in the dark. Sound bounces off objects and returns to the typically large ears of bats. Some species of bats have small, simple noses, while others resemble pig snouts.

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What does a bat eat?

A bat diet mostly consists of insects. One individual may eat around 500 of them in an hour. Because they consume so many flies and mosquitoes, many species in North America play a crucial role in controlling pest populations. The little brown bat, one of the most common bats in the U.S., is an opportunistic feeder that catches prey right out of the air. Other bats feed on fruit, nectar, and even some small reptiles and amphibians.

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Bat habits

Where bats roost depends on the species. Some avoid heavily forested areas, preferring spaces near human habitation. They can be found in barns, attics, silos, churches, tree hollows, and on rock ledges. Species that do enjoy tree cover roost in the canopies of forests or under tree bark. We most commonly remove bats from properties in Georgia, Texas, North Carolina, Florida, and South Carolina. Contact your local Trutech office today to learn about our bat removal and exclusion services!

Can bats see?

Likely due to the popular saying, “blind as a bat,” many people mistakenly believe that bats are blind. However, over 900 bat species exist in the world, and not one of them completely lacks the ability to see. Still, some types have better vision than others. For example, the two main species of bats, megabats and microbats, have distinct ways of viewing the world.

Bats in the home

Regardless of the type, bats in the home have to be removed. Their feces and urine will pile up on attic floors, where fungal pathogens can grow before becoming airborne. Bats can also carry rabies and make a lot of noise during the night. Due to the risk of disease, it’s best to allow the professionals at Trutech to identify the type of bat present and decide the best means of control.

Wildlife problem? Call us for immediate help

Frequently Asked Questions

Likely due to the popular saying, “blind as a bat,” many people mistakenly believe that bats are blind. However, over 900 bat species exist in the world, and not one of them completely lacks the ability to see. Still, some types have better vision than others. For example, the two main species of bats, megabats and microbats, have distinct ways of viewing the world.

These larger bats can actually see quite well, especially at night. Their eyes appear oversized relative to their heads, are forward-facing, and give the bats binocular vision. They also have mirror-like retinas that reflect and capture the limited available light. Microbats, on the other hand, have underdeveloped vision. The little brown bat, the most common in the U.S., relies on echolocation to hunt prey and avoid obstacles instead of eyesight. Their vision is just sharp enough to allow them to see beyond the scope of their echolocation.

While some bats migrate to warmer locations in the winter, most will hibernate. Before their cold weather rest begins, these animals mate. Females typically give birth to one or two baby bats, called pups, around mid-May to early June.

When baby bats are born, the pups are blind and helpless. Female bats gather in warm areas, such rafters and attics, to form maternal colonies. A baby bat clings to its mother fiercely at first, and the mother only leaves for short periods in the evening to hunt.

As pups grow and develop, mothers slowly increase their hunting time to wean their offspring. Once the baby bats are about five weeks old, they begin to fly and hunt but may still nurse until they can feed on their own.

Most bats live less than 20 years in the wild, but six species can live more than 30 years! In 2006, this tiny bat made it to 41 years and set a record for the oldest bat.

Some bats return to the safe roost year after year. So if you have bats in your attic, it might turn into a 30 year problem.

Fruit bats, also known as Old World bats or flying foxes, are among the largest bats in the world. They differ from other species because they navigate with their vision rather than echolocation. Fruit bats get their name from their diet of fruit and nectar.

With a long nose, large eyes, and pointy ears, some fruit bat species resemble dogs or foxes. They have wide chests and range from two inches to over a foot long. These bats have coarse, tan to brownish-black fur, wide leathery wings, and tiny feet with strong, claw-tipped toes to grip tree limbs.

Fruit bats feed on nectar, fruit, and even flowers. They chew on fruit to get the sweet juice and then spit out any seeds, rind, or pulp. Larger fruit bats use their claws to climb and find hidden and hard-to-reach food.

Limited to subtropical and tropical climates, the fruit bat is not native to the U.S. However, the pests have a confirmed presence in Florida. Warming temperatures and habitat loss may force more of these mammals into southern states. For now, they are accidental invaders.

Little brown bats are one of the most common types of bat in North America. They thrive from Alaska to northern Florida but are absent from the plains region, where conditions are not suitable. Bats are the only mammals that can truly fly, and the little brown species can speed through the air at up to 22 mph.