Wild Hog Control

Wild Hog Control, Trapping & Removal Services

We can rid you of Wild Hog problems safely and efficiently

Wild hogs, also referred to as feral pigs, were introduced to North America in the 1500s. Since they damage property, spread disease, and negatively affect the environment, their increasing presence in many areas of the U.S. is cause for concern. In fact, government-culling efforts have been instated to thin their numbers. Despite this, it’s estimated that effectively controlling the four to five million wild hogs nationwide would require the removal of almost half their population annually.

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APPEARANCE

Mostly black or brown, wild hogs are covered in thick, coarse hair that may also be red or dark gray, depending on their region. They have stout, barrel-like bodies with short and slender legs. Their faces are relatively long with a straight snout. Small, beady eyes and poor eyesight are also distinguishing characteristics.

DIET

While wild pigs will eat almost anything that fits in their mouth, the opportunistic omnivores prefer plant products such as nuts, seeds, buds, and fruits. Insects, worms, small mammals, and the eggs of ground-nesting birds are also staples in their diet.

HABITAT

Originally, wild hogs were introduced in Florida, though they have since expanded their territory further west. As habitat generalists, the pests can live and thrive in virtually any environment. In addition, their high birth rates and long lifespans allow their populations to increase exponentially. Wild pigs are reported to live in at least 45 states.

TREATMENT SOLUTIONS

ENTRY INTO HOMES OR BUSINESSES

ENTRY INTO HOMES OR BUSINESSES

Wooded properties are especially attractive to these pests, as they often provide shelter, nesting materials, food, and water. Picnics, outdoor gatherings, or grilling and cooking outside may draw them closer to homes. Likewise, unfenced yards are typically more susceptible to hogs.

PROBLEMS & DAMAGE

PROBLEMS & DAMAGE

Wild hogs are estimated to cause 1.5 billion dollars in damages annually through their destructive eating habits, the spread of disease, and harm to livestock. The pests disrupt natural nutrient cycles in soil and increase bacterial contamination in waterways through rooting, wallowing, and trampling. Common diseases transmitted to humans by feral hogs include swine brucellosis and tularemia.

PREVENTION & EXCLUSION

PREVENTION & EXCLUSION

In addition to being fast, strong, and large, wild hogs are very intelligent. They often find ways to get to food despite fences and other non-lethal exclusion techniques. As such, it is very difficult to keep the pests away once they have made residential properties part of their foraging area. To reduce the likelihood of attracting them into yards, avoid planting fruit- or nut-bearing trees and properly dispose of food. Outdoor chicken feed or pet food should also be brought indoors or stored in tightly sealed containers after use.

TRAPPING & REMOVAL

TRAPPING & REMOVAL

Attempts to control wild hogs with commercially available products are often costly and not very effective. Trapping is often the most affordable and efficient form of control. However, wild hogs can be exceptionally strong and cunning, making any interaction with them dangerous. Because of the risk of injury, removal of feral hogs is best left to the trained wildlife specialists at Trutech.

Questions Customers have about Wild Hogs

QUESTION:

Can you remove/deter pigs from invading our front yard? We’ve had between 6-12 pigs visiting our lawn every night. They are getting into nearly everyone’s front yards in our cul-de-sac and ripping up the grass and flower/bush beds.

-Sugar Land, TX

ANSWER:

While I apologize that you are dealing with these feral hogs. Deterrents are very ineffective for hogs. Population reduction and trapping of the hogs is the best means for a solution to help rid you of this issue.


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