Prairie Dog Control

Prairie Dog Control, Trapping & Removal Services

We can rid you of Prairie Dog problems safely and efficiently

Prairie dogs are small, burrowing members of the squirrel family commonly seen throughout the Western United States. The curious rodents band together in social groups to create extensive underground tunnels with many chambers dedicated to sleeping, nursing, and waste disposal. At the turn of the 20th century, there were ongoing efforts to exterminate prairie dogs that successfully culled over 95 percent of the animals. Today, two species are still considered threatened or endangered, while most other types of prairie dogs have rebounded to become pests yet again.

Animal Sounds

ANIMAL SOUNDS

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APPEARANCE

Growing an average of 12 inches long and weighing between 1.5 and 3 pounds, prairie dogs are short, squat mammals with stumpy legs and round heads. Their coats are typically tan or light brown, and they have a habit of standing upright to survey the surrounding landscape for signs of danger. Prairie dog communication is made up of high-pitched barks, which some biologists believe to be second in complexity only to human language.

DIET

Prairie dogs keep diets that consist largely of grasses, roots, and seeds. They also enjoy prickly pear fruit and flowers. When scavenging for food, prairie dogs typically graze near their personal burrows and do not venture very far.

HABITAT

Wide open grasslands and prairies are favored habitats of the rodents. Since they rely on being able to constantly scan the horizon and sky for danger, prairie dogs tend to avoid areas with dense brush or large amounts of tree cover. Their burrows can become incredibly large, with individual tunnels reaching over 15 feet long and extending more than 6 feet below the surface.

TREATMENT SOLUTIONS

ENTRY INTO HOMES OR BUSINESSES

ENTRY INTO HOMES OR BUSINESSES

The rodents become nuisances when they burrow into pastures, fields, and farmland. Since most livestock pastures are open and grassy, prairie dogs find them incredibly attractive places to burrow and feed. The animals will not come into human houses or manmade buildings, but their tunnels may cross below foundations or yards.

PROBLEMS & DAMAGE

PROBLEMS & DAMAGE

Tunnel systems created by prairie dogs weaken the soil and cause problems for farm machinery and livestock. Their underground structures can also wreak havoc on irrigation systems, embankments, and roadways. Cattle and other livestock may suffer when prairie dogs invade their pastures since the rodents compete with grazing animals for the same food sources. Additionally, prairie dogs are susceptible to the plague, which is transmitted by ticks and mites and can be spread to humans.

PREVENTION & EXCLUSION

PREVENTION & EXCLUSION

Prairie dogs are extremely cautious and much prefer to have wide open vantage points when grazing outside of their burrows. Erecting fences near burrow sites can hinder their ability to detect danger and inspire them to move elsewhere. One of the most effective ways for farmers to counter unwanted prairie dog burrowing activities is to plow the affected fields and let them sit crop-free for at least a year. The use of flood irrigation may also discourage the rodents from burrowing in fields.

TRAPPING & REMOVAL

TRAPPING & REMOVAL

Many trapping and removal options are available to property owners. However, these solutions require the expertise of trained professionals. Individuals should contact Trutech wildlife removal experts as they can assess the situation and execute efficient removal of nuisance prairie dogs.


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