Issues with Armadillo Droppings

Armadillos have tough, armored bodies and strong claws, making them efficient diggers and expert hunters of insects. They spend most of their waking lives foraging for food and eating, meaning they produce plenty of poop. Armadillo droppings create issues for homeowners in yards, as they not only smell bad but are easily stepped on and difficult to clean up. Feces are often scattered near backyard burrowing sites or around ditches with damp soil. When identifying armadillo scat, look for small groups of inch-long, brown pellets.

What Attracts Armadillos into Yards?

Armadillos inhabit the southern U.S., where they enjoy land rife with ants and termites. Properties near rivers or shaded areas often notice increased amounts of armadillo scat, in addition to numerous eight-inch-wide holes. Despite possessing poor eyesight, the pests dig and smell with impressive accuracy. Bugs and grubs nearly 8 inches underground can be sniffed out and dug up with ease, which is why armadillo droppings contain soil and litter fragments along with insect parts. Berries, fruit, bird eggs, fire ants, and scorpions are a few other foods that attract the animals to residential yards.

Avoiding Risk

While their consumption of wasps, leeches, and centipedes can be viewed as valuable, armadillos tear up backyards while foraging. As a result, their presence often creates more damage than it prevents. In addition to harming and fouling lawns, the animals also carry some health risks. Humans who handle armadillo droppings without proper protective equipment put themselves at risk for roundworm infections. This is why unhygienic and pest-ridden yards should be dealt with by Trutech’s experienced technicians.